Resource | Research | Benefit Content/Cost
Exploring the Causes of State Variation in SNAP Administrative Costs

The Federal Government fully funds SNAP benefits, but FNS and state agencies share administrative expenses, with each paying about 50 percent. State administrative costs per case varies widely by state. This study explores a number of factors, including state economic conditions, SNAP caseload characteristics, state SNAP policies, to try to explain the variation by state.

Resource | Research | General/Other
An Estimate of Potential Identity Theft In SNAP In Two States

This exploratory study estimated the extent to which potential identity theft was used to obtain Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits in Florida and Missouri during a 12-month period (June 2016 to May 2017). The prevalence of potential identity theft was estimated from examining the SNAP caseload data for cases with data discrepancies requiring referral to the state SNAP agency for further investigation. Because identity theft can be truly determined only after a detailed fraud investigation is conducted, the study estimates are to be considered potential identity theft rather than true identity theft.

Resource | Research | Impacts/Evaluations
The Evaluation of Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentives Interim Report

The Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive (FINI) grant program provided $100 million to fund and evaluate projects that were intended to increase fruit and vegetable purchases among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants by providing incentives at the point of purchase. Grants were awarded in Fiscal Years (FYs) 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 to State and local governmental entities and nonprofit organizations. An independent evaluation measured the impact of FINI on two primary outcomes, increasing fruit and vegetable (1) expenditures and (2) consumption among SNAP households, and on several secondary outcomes. The pilot projects are not included in the evaluation. This report presents the results of the process evaluation and outcome evaluation through September 2017.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
SNAP Community Characteristics - Wyoming

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.05 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 32,606 people in Wyoming. The program served 59 percent of those eligible for benefits in Wyoming in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
SNAP Community Characteristics - Wisconsin

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.05 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 805,540 people in Wisconsin. The program served 100 percent of those eligible for benefits in Wisconsin in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
SNAP Community Characteristics - West Virginia

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.5 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 367,908 people in West Virginia. The program served 82.2 percent of those eligible for benefits in West Virginia in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
SNAP Community Characteristics - Washington

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.53 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 1,070,933 people in Washington. The program served 100 percent of those eligible for benefits in Washington in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
SNAP Community Characteristics - Virginia

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.23 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 860,375 people in Virginia. The program served 83.4 percent of those eligible for benefits in Virginia in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
SNAP Community Characteristics - Vermont

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.12 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 84,994 people in Vermont. The program served 100 percent of those eligible for benefits in Vermont in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.