Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

SUN Programs Style Guide

/sites/default/files/styles/background_full/public/media/image/sun-brand-hero-teal.jpg?itok=adW8AJm9

USDA has new, flexible strategies for providing children with food and nutrition support in the summertime. This enhanced suite of tools is called SUN Programs: USDA’s Summer Nutrition Programs for Kids

The SUN name – derived from the words Summer and Nutrition – reflects the broader, brighter impact USDA’s Summer Nutrition Programs will have on kids across the nation, helping them thrive during summer and beyond.

USDA staff, contractors, implementing agencies and partners can use the brand guidelines for developing materials and communications about the SUN programs.

SUN Brand Logos

summer nutrition program for kids logo in color
Image Files

 

SUN logo
Image Files

 

USDA Summer Nutrition Program for Kids logo in color
Image Files

SUN Bucks Sub-Brand Logos

sun bucks logo in color
Image Files

 

usda sun bucks logo in color
Image Files

SUN Meals Sub-Brand Logos

SUN Meals logo
Image Files

 

USDA Sun Meals Logo in color
Image Files

SUN Meals To-Go Sub-Brand Logos

sun meals to go in color logo
Image Files

 

USDA Sun Meals to go logo in color
Image Files
Enable Printing
False
Date
File Upload
Drupal
Resource type
Technical Assistance & Guidance
Guidance Documents
Resource materials (Drupal)
Brand Guidelines (4.94 MB)
No
Summary

The brand guidelines in this document are for USDA staff, contractors, implementing agencies and partners to use for developing materials and communications about the SUN programs.

Page updated: February 23, 2024

SNAP Forms: Applications, Periodic Reporting and Notices

Summary

The Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (the Act), requires verification of household eligibility for SNAP benefits, confirm household eligibility throughout participation in the program, and ensure that households receive the correct benefit amount. State agencies are responsible for determining the eligibility of applicant households and issuing benefits to those households entitled to benefits under the Act.

The federal regulations for implementing these procedures are contained in Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) in 7 CFR part 271, 7 CFR part 272, and 7 CFR part 273. Part 271 contains general information and definitions, Part 272 contains requirements for participating state agencies, and Part 273 contains procedures for the certification of eligible households.

SNAP Applications, Periodic Reporting and Notices

The information collected by state agencies and electively provided by households upon initial application and then recertification (an application to continue participation in the program after an initial period of eligibility) includes (PII), as well as information about various household circumstances, such as household size and income. Applications are available in electronic and paper format. Once electively provided by households, state agencies must verify application information provided to determine their SNAP eligibility and benefit amounts, and then conduct an interview with the applicant household. Interviews are conducted in person or over the telephone. The information requirements for recertification are similar. Households with regular earned income are generally required to recertify every 12 months, although the recertification period can be as little as one month, or as long as two years, based on their circumstances.

As part of the initial application and recertification process, state agencies are required to issue certain notices to households. This include notices when an application is denied, if an application is missing information, if a household misses their interview, if household benefits will soon expire, if household benefits will change, and when household benefits officially change. Notices provided by state agencies can be issued electronically or by paper.

Following initial certification or recertification, households are required to notify (FNS) of any changes to their household status on a quarterly basis, monthly basis, or whenever a change occurs based on the reporting options chosen by their state agency, in order to maintain SNAP benefits and eligibility. Most state agencies also use simplified or periodic reporting, which requires households to report only certain changes to their status during the certification period. All reporting requirements can be completed electronically or by paper.

Retention and Custody of Records

Under recordkeeping requirements, state agencies must maintain records to ascertain whether the program is administered in compliance with federal statutes and regulations. State agencies must maintain case records of households participating in SNAP for a period of three years from the date of origin. In addition, state agencies must also maintain the ability to search household case records in order to prevent individuals from receiving benefits in more than one household, and to prevent households from receiving benefits in more than one jurisdiction (commonly referred to as “duplicate participation”). Records can be maintained using automated retrieval systems rather than paper records.

SNAP regulations (7 CFR 273.21) provide for a one month or two-month reporting option to determine SNAP eligibility and benefits of the affected households. This requires households and state agencies to conduct reporting more frequently than a quarterly basis. This monthly collection is necessary to ensure the integrity of the program and to meet regulatory requirements. FNS notes that while all state agencies have the option to use monthly reporting, only one state uses this reporting system, and the number of households subject to this reporting system within the State is small.

Need and Use of the Information

To determine initial and continued eligibility for SNAP, applicants must provide, and state agencies must verify, various information on household members, such as age, income, resources, allowable deductions, and Social Security Numbers (SSNs). This information must be collected to ensure households are eligible for SNAP, receive the correct benefit, and maintain eligibility for the program. This information collection is mandatory for state agencies that administer SNAP, as they are responsible for accepting applications from, and determining eligibility for, individuals and households that apply for SNAP. While a response is voluntary for households that apply for SNAP, it is required in order for them to obtain or maintain SNAP benefits from their state agency.

Request for Comments

Comments regarding this information collection received by March 25, 2024 will be considered. Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection should be submitted within 30 days of the publication of this notice on the following website www.reginfo.gov/​public/​do/​PRAMain. Find this particular information collection by selecting “Currently under 30-day Review—Open for Public Comments” or by using the search function. An agency may not conduct or sponsor a collection of information unless the collection of information displays a currently valid OMB control number and the agency informs potential persons who are to respond to the collection of information that such persons are not required to respond to the collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.

Enable Printing
False
Date
Publication Date
File Upload
Drupal
Resource type
Federal Register Documents
Comment Request
Comment Period End Date
No
Summary

The Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (the Act), requires verification of household eligibility for SNAP benefits, confirm household eligibility throughout participation in the program, and ensure that households receive the correct benefit amount. State agencies are responsible for determining the eligibility of applicant households and issuing benefits to those households entitled to benefits under the Act.

Page updated: February 23, 2024

Non-Congregate Meal Service in Rural Areas Q&As

DATE:February 21, 2024
POLICY MEMO:SFSP 07-2024, SP 13-2024
SUBJECT:Non-Congregate Meal Service in Rural Areas Questions and Answers
TO:Regional Directors
Child Nutrition Programs
All Regions
State Directors
Child Nutrition Programs
All States

This guidance updates previously issued questions and answers to clarify the rural non-congregate summer meals option established through the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2023 (the Act) (PL 117-328), and codified through the interim final rulemaking (IFR), Establishing the Summer EBT Program and Rural Non-congregate Option in the Summer Meal Programs (88 FR 90230). The Act authorized permanent, non-congregate meal service through the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and National School Lunch Program’s (NSLP) Seamless Summer Option (SSO) for rural areas with no congregate meal service. This memorandum and its attachment supersede SFSP 01-2023, SP 05-2023, Implementation Guidance: Summer 2023 Non-Congregate Meal Service in Rural Areas – Revised, issued February 28, 2023, and SFSP 07-2023, SP 14-2023, Questions and Answers #2: Summer 2023 Non-Congregate Meal Service in Rural Areas, issued April 20, 2023.

Please note that the purpose of this guidance memorandum is to update earlier guidance originally issued for summer 2023 operations, and to ensure consistency with the provisions of the IFR. Future Q&A guidance will address additional implementation topics based on feedback received by state agencies and program stakeholders.

FNS appreciates the exceptional efforts of state agencies and local program operators working to meet the nutritional needs of participants during the summer months. SFSP and SSO rely on innovative and collaborative efforts to provide summer meals to children in need. We look forward to working with our program partners and other stakeholders on the administration and operation of the non-congregate meal service for rural communities.

State agencies are reminded to distribute this memorandum to program operators immediately. Program operators should direct any questions concerning this guidance to their state agency. State agencies with questions should contact the appropriate FNS regional office.

Sincerely,

J. Kevin Maskornick
Director
Community Meals Policy Division

Jessica Saracino
Director
Program Monitoring and Operational Support Division

Attachment

Enable Printing
False
Date
FNS Document #
SFSP 07-2024, SP 13-2024
File Upload
Drupal
Resource type
Policy
Policy Memos
Resource materials (Drupal)
Policy memo (229.94 KB)
No
Summary

This guidance updates previously issued questions and answers to clarify the rural non-congregate summer meals option established through the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2023, and codified through the interim final rulemaking, Establishing the Summer EBT Program and Rural Non-congregate Option in the Summer Meal Programs

Page updated: February 23, 2024

Community Eligibility Provision Fact Sheet

Enable Printing
False
Date
Resource type
Technical Assistance & Guidance
Fact Sheets
Resource materials (Drupal)
Print version (152.72 KB)
No
Summary

The Community Eligibility Provision is a National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program meal service option that allows schools and school districts located in high poverty areas to offer breakfast and lunch at no cost to all enrolled students.

Page updated: February 22, 2024

Ready to transform your future?

SNAP Employment and Training (E&T) is here for you every step of the way, offering not just a job, but a path to growth and success. Visit our E&T page for more information and resources.
a woman wearing a yellow safety vest, gloves and donning commercial grade headphones for ear protection
1
Page updated: February 21, 2024

Explanation of Changes in the CACFP and SFSP Serious Deficiency Proposed Rule

On Feb. 21, 2024, FNS published a proposed rule Serious Deficiency Process in the Child and Adult Care Food Program and Summer Food Service Program. The table below provides an explanation of the major proposed changes as they relate to CACFP and SFSP.

Establishing a Serious Deficiency Process for SFSP and Extending the Process to CACFP Unaffiliated Sponsored Centers
Existing ProcessProposed Change
No serious deficiency process in regulations for SFSP sponsors and CACFP unaffiliated sponsored centers.
  • Establishes a serious deficiency process for SFSP sponsors. (7 CFR 225.18)
  • Extends the serious deficiency process to CACFP unaffiliated sponsored centers. (7 CFR 226.25)
Serious Deficiency Determination in CACFP & SFSP
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • A CACFP institution or day care home is reviewed by the administering agency. The administering agency identifies findings that rise to the level of serious deficiencies. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(ii), (2)(ii), & (3)(ii))
  • Once serious deficiencies are identified, the administering agency issues a notice of serious deficiency and an opportunity to submit a corrective action plan (CAP). The administering agency must approve the CAP and the CAP must be implemented for the serious deficiency to be temporarily deferred. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(iii)(A), (2)(iii)(A), & (3)(iii)(A))
  • If the CAP is not submitted, approved, and implemented, the administering agency must move to termination and disqualification procedures. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(iii)(C), (2)(iii)(C), & (3)(iii)(C))
  • Findings that trigger the serious deficiency process in CACFP are known as serious deficiencies. (7 CFR 226.2, 226.6(c)(1)(ii), (2)(ii), & (3)(ii))
  • Findings characterized as administrative weaknesses are known as ‘significant operational problems’ in SFSP. (7 CFR 225.6(c)(2))
  • A CACFP institution, CACFP day care home or SFSP sponsor is declared seriously deficient at the point of termination from the program. This creates consistency between regulations and statutory language. (7 CFR 225.18(a)(2)(vi) & 226.25(a)(2)(vi))
  • Findings that trigger the serious deficiency process in CACFP and SFSP are defined as serious management problems. This further creates consistency between regulations and statutory language. (7 CFR 225.2 & 226.2)
  • Serious management problems are characterized as the type of administrative weakness that affects an institution’s ability to meet CACFP performance standards or affects quality of meals or integrity of claims at a day care home or center. This standard extends to SFSP. (7 CFR 225.2 & 226.2)
  • Replace the term “significant operational problems” in SFSP regulations with the term “serious management problems” to ensure consistency. (7 CFR 225.2)
Identifying “Serious Management Problems” in CACFP & SFSP
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • Current SFSP and CACFP regulations list out types of serious deficiencies. However, the Serious Deficiency Handbook outlines an analysis process to identify when findings rise to the level of serious deficiencies. This process is not in regulations. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(ii), (2)(ii), & (3)(ii))
  • The 5 steps outlined in the Handbook include:
    • Nature of the requirements that relate to the problem
    • Severity of the problem
    • Degree of responsibility
    • Impact on program integrity
    • Institution’s history of participation
  • Findings that trigger the serious deficiency process in CACFP and SFSP are defined as serious management problems. (7 CFR 225.2 & 226.2)
  • The analysis process outlined in the the Serious Deficiency Handbook is codified and requires administering agencies to conduct an analysis to identifying serious management problems. (7 CFR 225.18(a)(3) & 226.25(a)(3)) This includes:
    • Nature of the requirements that relate to the problem
    • Severity of the problem
    • Degree of responsibility
    • Impact on program integrity
    • Institution’s history of participation
  • Remove the list of serious deficiencies in CACFP and SFSP regulations.
Path to Full Correction for CACFP Institutions
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • If a CAP is approved and implemented, the CACFP institution’s serious deficiencies are considered fully and permanently corrected and the serious deficiency status is temporarily deferred. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(iii)(B)(1), (2)(iii)(B)(1), & (3)(iii)(B)(1)
  • If a repeat serious deficiency occurs, the state agency moves to termination and disqualification. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(iii)(B)(3), (2)(iii)(B)(3), & (3)(iii)(B)(3))
  • There are no parameters set out in regulations around when a serious deficiency is considered repeat. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(1)(iii)(B)(3), (2)(iii)(B)(3), & (3)(iii)(B)(3))
  • Fully and permanently corrected is not defined in regulations.
  • CACFP institutions with less 100 facilities are reviewed once every 3 years. (7 CFR 226.6(m)(6)(i))
  • CACFP institutions with 100 facilities or more are reviewed once every 2 years. (7 CFR 226.6(m)(6)(ii))
  • Establishes parameters for achieving full correction of serious management problems. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(i))
  • If a CAP is approved and implemented, the CACFP institution is reviewed more frequently and at least once every 2 years. The institution remains on this 2-year cycle until it can demonstrate that it has achieved full correction. (this applies to all CACFP institutions) (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(i))
  • Full correction is achieved when all of the following is met: (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(i))
  1. CAP is submitted to the state agency, CAP is accepted and CAP is fully implemented;
  2. At least 2 full reviews, occurring at least once every 2 years, reveal no new or repeat serious management problems;
  3. All reviews between the first and last full review reveal no new or repeat serious management problems, including targeted or follow up reviews; and
  4. The first and last full review occur at least 24 months apart.
  • Once serious management problems are fully corrected, the serious management problems would be considered vacated, not deferred. Therefore, temporary deferment is no longer applicable. (7 CFR 226.25(a)(6)(iii))
  • If new serious management problems are identified before the institution demonstrates full correction of the initial serious management problem, the institution will remain on a more frequent review cycle and it must demonstrate full correction of all serious management problems. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(i)(D))
  • If a serious management problem is repeated before the institution demonstrated full correction, the state agency must move to terminate and disqualify the institution. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(iv))
  • Serious management problems that occur after the institution has demonstrated full correction would not be considered repeat, and therefore would not lead to termination. Instead, the serious management problem would trigger the start of a new serious deficiency process, and therefore would be subject to more frequent reviews. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(iii))
Path to Full Correction in SFSP Sponsors
Existing ProcessProposed Change
No serious deficiency process set out in regulations.
  • Establishes parameters for achieving full correction of serious management problems. (7 CFR 225.18(c)(3))
  • The path to full correction for SFSP sponsors follows the same framework as CACFP institutions with the exception of frequency of reviews and timeframe for achieving full correction. (7 CFR 225.18(c)(3))
  • If a CAP is approved and implemented, the SFSP sponsor is reviewed more frequently and at least once every year. The sponsor remains on this yearly cycle until it can demonstrate that it has achieved full correction. (7 CFR 225.18(c)(3))
  • Full correction is achieved when all of the following is met (7 CFR 225.18(c)(3)):
  1. CAP is submitted to the state agency, CAP is accepted and CAP is fully implemented;
  2. At least 2 full reviews, occurring at least once every year, reveal no new or repeat serious management problems;
  3. All reviews between the first and last full review reveal no new or repeat serious management problems, including targeted or follow up reviews; and
  4. The first and last full review occur at least 12 months apart.
Path to Full Correction in CACFP Family Day Care Homes & Unaffiliated Sponsored Centers
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • If a CAP is approved and implemented, the CACFP day care home’s serious deficiencies are considered fully and permanently corrected and the serious deficiency status is temporarily deferred. (7 CFR 226.16(l)(3)(ii))
  • If a repeat serious deficiency occurs, the sponsoring organization moves to termination and disqualification. (7 CFR 226.16(l)(3)(iii))
  • There are no parameters set out in regulations around when a serious deficiency is considered repeat.
  • Fully and permanently corrected is not defined in regulations.
  • There is no serious deficiency process for CACFP unaffiliated sponsored centers set out in regulations.
  • Establishes parameters for achieving full correction of serious management problems. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(ii))
  • The path to full correction for day care homes and unaffiliated centers follows the same framework for CACFP institutions and SFSP sponsors, with the exception of frequency of reviews and timeframe for achieving full correction. (7 CFR 226.25(a)(7))
  • If a CAP is approved and implemented, the day care home or unaffiliated center is reviewed at the same frequency as existing regulations. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(ii))
  • Unlike the process for CACFP institutions and SFSP sponsors, unaffiliated centers and day care homes are not reviewed more frequently once a serious management problem is identified. (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(ii))
  • Day care homes and unaffiliated centers are currently reviewed at least 3 times a year, which gives the sponsoring organization the ability to provide close oversight of program operations. (7 CFR 226.16(d)(4))
  • Full correction is achieved when all of the following is met (7 CFR 226.25(c)(3)(ii)):
  1. CAP is submitted to the sponsoring organization, CAP is accepted and CAP is fully implemented;
  2. At least three consecutive full reviews reveal no new or repeat serious management problems; and
  3. All reviews between the first and last full review reveal no new or repeat serious management problems, including targeted reviews.
Reciprocal Disqualification in All Child Nutrition Programs
Existing ProcessProposed Change
No reciprocal disqualification process set out in regulations.
  • Establishes a reciprocal disqualification process that prohibits state agencies from approving an application for any program operator that is terminated for cause from a Child Nutrition Program (CNP) and placed on a National Disqualified List (NDL). (7 CFR 210.9(d), 215.7(g), 220.7(i), 225.6(b)(12), & 226.6(b)(1)(xiii))
  • The state agency must deny application for any Child Nutrition Program if the applicant has been terminated for cause and the applicant is on the NDL for CACFP or SFSP. (7 CFR 225.18(e)(1) & 226.25(e)(1))
  • For any program operator with an existing program agreement, the administering agency must terminate and disqualify the program operator when it is determined that the program operator participating in a different CNP was terminated for cause. (7 CFR 225.18(e)(1) & 226.25(e)(1))
  • This process applies to all CNPs, however, two options are proposed for reciprocal disqualification procedures for school food authorities (SFAs) operating CACFP and SFSP,
  1. Option A: Termination and disqualification and subsequent reciprocal disqualification procedures apply SFAs, including the entity itself and responsible principals and individuals.
  2. Options B: Termination and disqualification and subsequent reciprocal disqualification procedures apply to responsible principals and individuals only. The SFA itself is not subject to reciprocal disqualification.
     
Suspension in CACFP & SFSP
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • There is no suspension process in SFSP.
  • In CACFP, state agencies have discretion to implement the suspension process for false or fraudulent claims. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(5)(ii)(A))
  • Per regulations, state agencies “may” suspend an institution for false or fraudulent claims. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(5)(ii)(A))
     
  • State agencies MUST suspend a CACFP institution’s participation if the institution has submitted false or fraudulent claims. (7 CFR 226.25(f)(2))
  • Two options are proposed for consideration on suspension in SFSP.
  1. The state agency applies the serious deficiency process when it determines that a sponsor has submitted false or fraudulent claims, with no suspension of participation. The sponsor is eligible to continue to participate in the program and receive payments for all valid claims.
  2. The state agency must apply suspension procedures, at the same time it issues a notice of proposed termination, when it determines that a sponsor submitted false or fraudulent claims
Good Standing in All Child Nutrition Programs
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • There is no definition of ‘good standing’ in regulations.
  • ‘Good standing’ is a standard that is used across Child Nutrition Programs and is defined through guidance.
  • Defines good standing. Good standing means the status of a program operator that meets its Program responsibilities, is current with its financial obligations, and if applicable, has fully implemented all corrective actions with the required period of time. (7 CFR 210.2, 215.2, 220.2, 225.2, & 226.2)
  • A program operator is not in ‘good standing’ if serious management problems are identified. A program operator can return to ‘good standing’ if all of the following criteria are met (7 CFR 225.18(a)(4) & 226.25(a)(4):
  1. Any outstanding debts are paid, and
  2. All corrective actions are implemented.
  • Full correction does not need to be achieved to return to ‘good standing,’ but all corrective actions must be fully implemented. (7 CFR 225.18(a)(4) & 226.25(a)(4))
National Disqualified List for CACFP & SFSP
Existing ProcessProposed Change
State agencies and sponsoring organizations may access the National Disqualified List (NDL). Sponsoring organizations obtain eAuthentication level one clearance and can view the NDL with all personally identifiable information (PII) removed. They cannot manipulate any data in the system. If the sponsoring organization finds a match, they may need to confirm with the state agency. (7 CFR 226.6(c)(7))
  • Extends NDL Access to SFSP Sponsors. This option would allow sponsor access for SFSP with eAuthentication level one access (the same process that currently exists for CACFP sponsoring organizations). (7 CFR 225.18(e)(2) & 226.25(e)(2)
  • Codifies responsibilities of administering agencies in implementing systems of records, which includes the NDL, as described in the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act. (225.18(e)(3) & 226.25(e)(3))
Multi-State Sponsoring Organizations (MSSOs) in CACFP & SFSP
Existing ProcessProposed Change
  • State agencies and Regional Offices apply existing, but outdated, guidance when working with MSSOs.
  • FNS has issued the following guidance on MSSO operations: FNS Instruction 788-5, Approval of Administrative Budgets for Multi-State Sponsoring Organizations of Family Day Care Homes – Child Care Food Program, October 25, 1982; FNS Instruction 788-16, Administrative Procedures for Multi-State Sponsoring Organization – Child Care Food Program, October 19, 1983; FNS Instruction 788-6, Revision 2, Availability of Institutions' Records to Administering Agencies, November 1, 1991; FNS Instruction 796-2, Revision 4, Financial Management – Child and Adult Care Food Program, December 11, 2013; and the memorandum, Applicability of FNS Instruction 788-16 to Multi-State Proprietary CACFP Sponsors, June 25, 2003.
  • The existence of multiple outdated guidance documents on managing MSSOs result in inconsistent application of procedures.
  • Defines MSSOs in both CACFP and SFSP regulations. MSSO means a sponsor or sponsoring organization that operators more than one site or facility in more than one state. (7 CFR 225.2 & 226.2)
  • Requires state agencies to ask all applicants if they are operating or intend to operate in another state. (7 CFR 225.6(c)(5), 226.6(b)(1)(xviv), & 226.6(b)(2)(iii)(L))
  • Addresses responsibilities of the cognizant state agency, which is the agency responsible for oversight of SFSP and CACFP in the state where the MSSO’s headquarters are located. (7 CFR 225.2, 225.6(n)(ii), 226.2, & 226.6(o)(ii))
  • Clarifies monitoring and program oversight for all state agencies that have sites or facilities participating under the auspices of an MSSO. (7 CFR 225.6(n)(i) & 226.6(o)(i))
Enable Printing
True
No
Page updated: February 21, 2024

Waiver Requests to Offer Incentives to SNAP Recipients at SNAP Authorized Stores

Summary

SNAP equal treatment provisions at 7 CFR 278.2(b) and 7 CFR 274.7(f) require that SNAP recipients receive treatment equal to that received by other customers at all stores authorized to participate in SNAP with the exception that sales tax may not be charged on eligible foods purchased with SNAP benefits. This equal treatment provision prohibits both negative treatment (such as discriminatory practices) as well as preferential treatment (such as incentive programs). Pursuant to Section 4008 of the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, Public Law 115–334 (2018 Farm Bill), individual SNAP authorized retailers (or private organizations or governmental entities, which partner with authorized stores) may request that FNS waive the SNAP equal treatment provisions in order to be allowed to implement an incentive program the meets the requirements under 7 USC 2018(j) to encourage SNAP recipients to purchase healthier foods. Most SNAP authorized stores that offer incentives to SNAP recipients are either farmers' markets or part of a federally funded grant program that is authorized by statute, including the Gus Schumacher Nutrition Incentive Program (GusNIP) administered by the USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), and the Healthy Fluid Milk Incentive (HFMI) project administered by the Food and Nutrition Service.

Need and Use of the Information

Farmers markets are authorized to provide incentives to SNAP recipients under a blanket FNS waiver of the SNAP equal treatment provision, specifically for farmers' markets. Only incentive projects that are funded outside of a federal grant, other than projects funded by farmers' markets, are required to have a waiver from FNS to provide incentives to SNAP households at authorized SNAP retailer locations. FNS provided incentive waivers to SNAP retailers prior to passage of the 2018 Farm Bill under FNS' regular waiver process and has been providing the waivers under a streamlined approach since 2020. Over the past 3 years, FNS has received an average of nine incentive waiver requests that generally cover multiple retailer locations, and we expect those numbers to increase over the next 5 years. With this new streamlined process, the department estimates that out of 254,350 authorized retailers that participate in our program, approximately 730 different retailers would be covered under 15 different incentive waiver requests annually.

Request for Comments

Comments regarding this information collection received by March 22, 2024 will be considered. Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection should be submitted within 30 days of the publication of this notice on the following website www.reginfo.gov/​public/​do/​PRAMain. Find this particular information collection by selecting “Currently under 30-day Review—Open for Public Comments” or by using the search function. An agency may not conduct or sponsor a collection of information unless the collection of information displays a currently valid OMB control number and the agency informs potential persons who are to respond to the collection of information that such persons are not required to respond to the collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.

Enable Printing
False
Date
Publication Date
Resource type
Federal Register Documents
Comment Request
Comment Period End Date
No
Page updated: February 23, 2024

Serious Deficiency Process in the CACFP and SFSP

Summary

This rulemaking proposes important modifications to make the application of serious deficiency procedures in the Child and Adult Care Food Program and Summer Food Service Program consistent, effective, and in line with current requirements under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act.

The serious deficiency process provides a systematic way for state agencies and sponsoring organizations to correct serious management problems, and when that effort fails, protect child nutrition program integrity through due process. In response to public comments received on a prior rulemaking, the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) proposes improvements to ensure that application of the serious deficiency process is fair and fully implemented. 

FNS proposes to add clarity to the serious deficiency process by defining key terms, establishing a timeline for full correction, and establishing criteria for determining when the serious deficiency process must be implemented. This rulemaking will also address termination for cause and disqualification, implementation of legal requirements for records maintained on individuals on the National Disqualified List, and participation of multi-state sponsoring organizations.

Request for Comments

Written comments must be received on or before May 21, 2024 to be assured of consideration.

  • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments.
  • Mail: Send comments to: Navneet Kaur Sandhu, Program Integrity and Innovation Division, USDA Food and Nutrition Service, 1320 Braddock Place, Alexandria, VA 22314.

All written comments submitted in response to the provisions of this proposed rule will be included in the record and will be made available to the public. Please be advised that the substance of the comments and the identity of the individuals or entities submitting the comments will be subject to public disclosure. USDA will make the written comments publicly available on the internet via https://www.regulations.gov.

Enable Printing
False
Date
Publication Date
RIN
Resource type
Federal Register Documents
Proposed Rule
Comment Period End Date
No
Summary

This rulemaking proposes important modifications to make the application of serious deficiency procedures in the Child and Adult Care Food Program and Summer Food Service Program consistent, effective, and in line with current requirements under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act. 

Page updated: February 21, 2024

More Than a Job

/sites/default/files/styles/background_full/public/media/image/snap-et-MoreThanJob-hero_0.jpg?itok=XtfYX1rR

MORE THAN A JOB is a national campaign from the SNAP Office of Employment & Training (OET) to raise awareness about SNAP E&T services and opportunities and encourage enrollment among eligible SNAP participants. This community-informed campaign was developed through a series of listening sessions and concept testing with SNAP E&T participants, state and E&T provider staff, and other stakeholders.

The campaign tagline MORE THAN A JOB is a nod to the flexibility and reality of the program. SNAP E&T is more than a job—it provides a wide range of services and supports that can lead to a career. SNAP E&T programs across the country can empower SNAP participants to build new skills, go back to school, or take steps toward a new career path. SNAP E&T services and resources can be a catalyst to help SNAP participants reduce their need for SNAP over time.

GET INVOLVED | Submit a testimonial or give feedback on the campaign at morethanajob@usda.gov.

Enable Printing
False
Summary

"More than a Job" is a national campaign from the SNAP Office of Employment & Training to raise awareness about SNAP E&T services and opportunities and encourage enrollment among eligible SNAP participants. 

No
Page updated: February 21, 2024

More Than a Job Campaign Guidelines

Enable Printing
False
Date
FNS Document #
FNS-1041
Resource type
Technical Assistance & Guidance
Resource materials (Drupal)
Print version (1.56 MB)
No
Summary

SNAP E&T More than a Job Campaign Guidelines for state and territory use.

Page updated: February 21, 2024

State/Territory QR Codes

Enable Printing
False
Date
Resource type
Technical Assistance
No
Summary

Download a personalized QR code that links to your SNAP E&T website. 

Page updated: February 21, 2024

Printing Instructions: MORE THAN A JOB Campaign Materials

MORE THAN A JOB Poster (11" x 17")

Printing in-house (office of home)

  1. Download the poster file.
  2. Open the poster in Adobe Acrobat .
  3. Select “print."
  4. Under “page sizing and handling” select “actual size.”
  5. Make sure you have 11” x 17” tabloid paper in your printer.
  6. Select the “print” button.

Professional Printing

  1. Download the poster file.
  2. Share the file with the printer.
  3. Tell the printer the poster size is 11” x 17.”
  4. Request “four-color process printing” or “digital printing.”

MORE THAN A JOB Poster (8.5" x 11")

Printing in-house (office or home)

  1. Download the poster file.
  2. Open the poster in Adobe Acrobat.
  3. Select print.
  4. Under “page sizing and handling” select “fit."
  5. Select the “print” button.

Professional printing

  1. Download the poster file.
  2. Share the file with the printer.
  3. Tell the printer the poster size is 8.5” x 11."
  4. Request “four-color process printing” or “digital printing.”

MORE THAN A JOB Flyer (8.5" x 11")

Flyer is customizable

Printing in-house (office or home)

  1. Download the flyer file.
  2. Open the flyer in Adobe Acrobat Pro (not Adobe Reader).
  3. CUSTOMIZE your flyer with specifics about your program.
    1. All text in [brackets] is intended to be customized.
    2. Place your cursor in the brackets and type your content.
    3. Use Arial font when you insert your text.
    4. Insert your state or territory’s QR code that links directly to your program’s webpage.
      1. Open the PDF in Adobe Acrobat Pro.
      2. Select “Edit PDF” on the toolbar on the righthand side.
      3. Navigate to the QR code on the poster, select it, and delete the QR code.
      4. Download your custom QR code from the More Than a Job campaign webpage — once it’s downloaded, right click to copy the QR code .png, then paste it in the spot of the old QR code on the flyer.
      5. Be sure to delete the instructional copy “Insert State QR code below” above the code.
    5. When you are satisfied with your content, save the flyer.
    6. Select print.
    7. Under “page sizing and handling” select “fit.”
    8. Select the “print” button.

Professional printing

  1. Download the flyer file.
  2. Customize the flyer as directed above.
  3. When you are satisfied with your content, save the flyer.
  4. Share the file with the printer.
  5. Tell the print the flyer size is 8.5” x 11.”
  6. Request “four-color process printing” or “digital printing.”
Enable Printing
False
Summary

Instructions for printing SNAP Employment and Training MORE THAN A JOB campaign materials.

No
Page updated: February 21, 2024

Campaign Core Messages

The following campaign messages can be used along with MORE THAN A JOB materials. You may customize or build on these based on your unique program names or local needs.

SNAP Employment and Training programs offer more than a job.

Many factors impact a person’s ability to get and keep a job. SNAP E&T programs offer free job training, personal support, and help with things like books, uniforms, transportation, and childcare.

The SNAP Employment and Training program can help you build a future. Take your next step with SNAP E&T.

SNAP E&T can provide job training and classes to help you find a new job or advance in your career. But support doesn’t have to end there. We provide case management and can help with unexpected needs that come up when you start a new job, like transportation, car repairs, or childcare.

SNAP Employment and Training programs are flexible. We want to connect you to programs and services that fit your goals and meet your needs.

SNAP E&T is not a one-size-fits-all approach. Our program meets you where you are and opens the door to new opportunities and career options. SNAP E&T provides free training programs, education and career counseling services, and personal support to help you meet your goals. Talk to your case manager about how to best meet your needs.

Enable Printing
False
Summary

MORE THAN A JOB Campaign core messages for use by state agencies to communicate to SNAP participants.

No
Page updated: February 21, 2024

Campaign Materials

MORE THAN A JOB campaign materials are free for state SNAP agencies to use and available for download. Some materials are print-ready for distribution and others are templates that can be customized to describe the benefits for individual state SNAP E&T programs.

Use the campaign materials to implement a MORE THAN A JOB campaign in your state or to supplement your SNAP E&T program’s ongoing communication efforts.

For ideas on how to implement MORE THAN A JOB campaign materials in your community, read the Campaign Guidelines.


Print-Ready Posters and Flyers

  • Posters and flyers are print-ready and should not be edited.
  • Review the printing instructions.
  • Use the links below each image to download the poster or flyer file.

Back to top


Customizable Flyers

Flyers are customizable. States are encouraged to customize the content in select areas to highlight the services and resources their program offers.

Back to top


Social Media

Download MORE THAN A JOB branded graphics to post on social media. For social media tips and sample copy to accompany the posts, view our Social Media Guide.

Back to top


Videos

Up your SNAP E&T program’s social media game with MORE THAN A JOB branded videos. These short videos are designed to be used as an outreach tool on social media platforms.

Enable Printing
False
Date
Resource type
Technical Assistance
Resource materials (Drupal)
(1.18 MB)
(2.49 MB)
(922.91 KB)
(3.85 MB)
(1.77 MB)
(1.05 MB)
(1.24 MB)
(1.86 MB)
(1.52 MB)
(1.1 MB)
(2.65 MB)
(1.09 MB)
(3.63 MB)
(5.05 MB)
(2.11 MB)
(2.48 MB)
(2.03 MB)
No
Summary

MORE THAN A JOB campaign materials are free for state SNAP agencies to use and available for download. 

Page updated: February 21, 2024

More Than a Job Social Media Guide

MORE THAN A JOB social media graphics and videos are available for download. Use this guide as a resource to craft post copy that’s effective and on message.

Tips for Posting on Social Media

  • Include a link to your state’s SNAP E&T program website so participants can access more information about the SNAP E&T program.
  • Don’t forget to include a photo or video! SNAP’s suggested post copy (or your own) should be posted alongside a More Than a Job social media graphic.
  • When appropriate, include a call to action in your post copy, such as “Talk with your SNAP case manager today” or “Call [insert phone number] to get started.”
  • Use the campaign hashtag #MoreThanAJob

Sample Post Copy

General Information about SNAP E&T

  • SNAP Employment and Training programs offer more than a job. Find programs that connect you to training, personal support, and help with things like books, uniforms, and childcare. #MoreThanAJob
  • Have you heard of SNAP Employment and Training? If you are a SNAP recipient, you may be eligible for job training, personal support, and help with things like books, uniforms, and childcare. #MoreThanAJob
  • The SNAP Employment and Training program can help you build a future. Take your next step with SNAP E&T. #MoreThanAJob

Highlight Specific Program Benefits

Education

  • Do you want to go back to school? SNAP Employment and Training can connect you to certifications, apprenticeships, and help with things like books and uniforms. Talk with your SNAP case manager to get started.

Childcare

  • Did you know [insert state’s name] SNAP Employment and Training programs offer more than just job training? Get help with things like childcare and transportation while you take your next step.

Transportation

  • Reliable transportation doesn’t need to get in the way of your job search. SNAP Employment and Training programs can help connect you with things like bus passes and gas cards. Take your next step with SNAP E&T today.

Testimonials

Consider using testimonials from your state’s E&T program in social media copy or other promotional material to humanize the program and present SNAP participants with outcomes and achievements. Testimonials should not be shared unless a release form has been signed by the participant.

Enable Printing
False
Summary

MORE THAN A JOB social media graphics and videos are available for download. Use this guide as a resource to craft post copy that’s effective and on message.

No
Page updated: February 21, 2024

Guidance for Submitting Unsolicited Proposals

Thank you for your interest in unsolicited proposals. Unsolicited proposals are a valuable means by which unique or novel ideas, concepts, methods, or approaches, which originated or have been developed outside the government, can be made available to the USDA for use in accomplishing its mission.

The unsolicited proposal is offered in the hope that government will evaluate it favorably and eventually, after conducting the required internal review and approvals, enter into a contract with the submitter for research on or development of the methods, approaches, or ideas it contains, or to provide the specific services, or the delivery of the items proposed.

Material submitted as an unsolicited proposal may not merely be an advance proposal for a specific USDA requirement that would normally be procured by competitive methods.

An unsolicited proposal must be prepared independent of government supervision or advice. The unsolicited proposal should present the proposed work with enough information and in sufficient detail to allow a determination that government support could enhance, benefit, and/or be of value to the USDA mission. The unsolicited proposal must be in sufficient detail to facilitate a comprehensive technical and cost evaluation which the government is required to perform as a portion of its consideration of the merit of the unsolicited proposal.

You are encouraged to submit for evaluation unique ideas or concepts, or innovative methods or approaches originated, conceived, or developed on your own and which have application to the work of the USDA. Unsolicited proposals which do not, in fact, contain unique ideas or concepts or innovative methods or approaches owned by the submitter will be returned to the submitter without evaluation. The review or evaluation of an unsolicited proposal submitted to the USDA does not imply a promise to pay, recognize innovation, originality, or ownership, or an agreement to restrict the use of the information contained therein except as provided by an appropriate legend on such proposal.

Unsolicited proposals should contain the content specified in the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 15.605, Contents of Unsolicited Proposals.

Companies have the choice of submitting the unsolicited proposal with or without restrictions on the use of any data it contains. Any unsolicited proposal or portion submitted without a restrictive legend will be considered free of all restrictions and may be used at the discretion of the government, subject to the restrictions of 18 USC 1905. Your unsolicited proposal may include data that you do not want disclosed for any purpose other than evaluation of the unsolicited proposal. If you want to impose such a restriction on the proposal, the title page must be marked with the following legend. (Proposals marked with any other legend cannot be considered):

Use and Disclosure of Data

This proposal includes data that shall not be disclosed outside the government and shall not be duplicated, used, or disclosed, in whole or in part, for any purpose other than to evaluate this proposal. However, if a contract is awarded to this company as a result of or in connection with the submission of these data, the government shall have the right to duplicate, use, or disclose the data to the extent provided in the resulting contract. This restriction does not limit the government’s right to use information contained in these data if they are obtained from another source without restriction. The data subject to this restriction is contained on in sheets (insert numbers or other identification of sheets).

Each sheet of your unsolicited proposal containing data that you want to restrict must be marked with the following legend:

Use or disclosure of the data contained on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this proposal.

The submitter should send the unsolicited proposal to the Director, Contracts Management Division (CMD) at: SM.FN.Director-CMD@usda.gov. A preliminary response from the government may be expected in approximately one week of the proposal submission.

Enable Printing
False
Summary

You are encouraged to submit for evaluation unique ideas or concepts, or innovative methods or approaches originated, conceived, or developed on your own and which have application to the work of the USDA.

No
Page updated: February 21, 2024

SNAP Online Application Policy Clarification

DATE:February 15, 2024
SUBJECT:Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – Online Application Policy
TO:All SNAP State Agencies
All Regions

The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) has seen an increased number of questions regarding online application policy from state agencies, regional offices, and advocates during systems development, management evaluations, and other venues. The purpose of this memo is to reiterate and clarify existing policy. This clarification applies to both initial and recertification applications.

Right to File with only Name, Address, and Signature

Federal law provides applicants with the right to file a SNAP application providing only name, address, and signature. Therefore, state agencies must accept and establish a filing date for any SNAP application that includes a name, address, and signature, even if other questions on the application form are incomplete. State agencies must consider such applications as “filed” and provide benefits from the filing date for eligible households.

For online applications, this means that state agencies can encourage but cannot require applicants to complete any additional fields in order to advance through and/or file/submit the application. The online application must include the name, address, and signature fields on one of its initial screens, and questions other than name, address, and signature must be optional. One option to meet this requirement is by including a “submit now” button immediately following the name, address, and signature fields. State agencies should also consider including a “submit” button on every screen or at frequent points as the applicant advances through the online application to prevent applicants from having to advance through every screen to submit.

These requirements apply to all types of SNAP applications, including multiprogram applications, paper applications, or mobile applications and apply regardless of other means of applying (such as the availability of paper applications). For example, a state is not permitted to require additional information on its online application based on the reasoning that households not wanting to provide more than name address and signature can apply via paper.

Notification of Right to File

Federal law also requires that the application contain a notification on or near the front page that applicants have the right to file an application with only name, address, and signature. The notification must be in plain and prominent language. For online applications, state agencies may accomplish this by placing the notification on an initial page. These requirements apply to all types of SNAP applications, including multiprogram applications, regardless of modality (paper applications, online applications, or mobile applications).

Identity Verification

State agencies may offer digital identity verification (or remote identity proofing, or RIDP) as a method of identity verification, but it must be optional. Digital identity verification can include knowledge-based verification, such as answering questions based on government records and credit reports, or evidence-based verification, such as providing a digital copy of a government-issued ID or proving control of a device, account, or address known to be associated with an identity. Knowledge-based verification systems are increasingly vulnerable to security threats. If digital verification is to be used, SNAP strongly encourages the use of evidence-based verification systems to prevent identity fraud.

Applicants must be permitted to file an application prior to verifying their identity and must be given the option to verify their identity through traditional means such as documentary evidence or collateral contact. State agencies must not require identity verification before the applicant submits the application even if the applicant has chosen to set up an account. Requiring identity verification before an applicant submits the application would violate Right to File policy.

Mobile Applications

State agencies may offer a mobile application for use on a mobile device like a phone or tablet that an applicant may choose to download and use. SNAP application forms on a mobile platform must follow the requirements listed above for Right to File. Therefore, once in the mobile SNAP application form, state agencies must not require more than name, address, and signature and must not require use of identity verification in order to submit an application. Applicants must be able to apply and recertify for SNAP without any other information beyond name, address, and signature. State agencies may still offer access to a portal in the mobile application, but state agencies must not require additional information, such as an e-mail address, to submit a SNAP application form.

Regional offices should work with state agencies to ensure compliance with Right to File regulations. The Modernization and Integration Branch (MIB) will assist regional offices in offering technical assistance to state agencies to help with specific situations and questions.

State agencies should contact their FNS regional office representatives with any questions.

Moira Johnston
Acting Director
Program Development Division
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

Enable Printing
False
Date
Resource type
Policy
Policy Memos
No
Summary

This memo reiterates and clarifies existing online application policy for state agencies. 

Page updated: February 20, 2024

Child Nutrition Programs: Income Eligibility Guidelines (2024-2025)

Summary

This notice announces the department's annual adjustments to the Income Eligibility Guidelines to be used in determining eligibility for free and reduced price meals, free milk, and Summer Electronic Benefit Transfer benefits for the period from July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2025. These guidelines are used by schools, institutions, and facilities participating in the National School Lunch Program (and Commodity School Program), School Breakfast Program, Special Milk Program for Children, Child and Adult Care Food Program, and Summer Food Service Program. Beginning in 2024, they will also be used by states and indian tribal organizations that administer the Summer Electronic Benefits Transfer for Children Program. The annual adjustments are required by section 9 of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act. The guidelines are intended to direct benefits to those children most in need and are revised annually to account for changes in the Consumer Price Index.

Dates

Applicable July 1, 2024.

Definition of Income

In accordance with the department's policy as provided in the Food and Nutrition Service publication Eligibility Manual for School Meals, “income,” as the term is used in this notice, means income before any deductions such as income taxes, Social Security taxes, insurance premiums, charitable contributions, and bonds. It includes the following: (1) monetary compensation for services, including wages, salary, commissions or fees; (2) net income from nonfarm self-employment; (3) net income from farm self-employment; (4) Social Security; (5) dividends or interest on savings or bonds or income from estates or trusts; (6) net rental income; (7) public assistance or welfare payments; (8) unemployment compensation; (9) government civilian employee or military retirement, or pensions or veterans payments; (10) private pensions or annuities; (11) alimony or child support payments; (12) regular contributions from persons not living in the household; (13) net royalties; and (14) other cash income. Other cash income would include cash amounts received or withdrawn from any source including savings, investments, trust accounts and other resources that would be available to pay the price of a child's meal.

“Income”, as the term is used in this notice, does not include any income or benefits received under any federal programs that are excluded from consideration as income by any statutory prohibition. Furthermore, the value of meals, milk, or EBT benefits to children shall not be considered as income to their households for other benefit programs in accordance with the prohibitions in section 12(e) of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act and section 11(b) of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 USC 1760(e) and 1780(b)).

The Income Eligibility Guidelines

The following are the Income Eligibility Guidelines to be effective from July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2025. The department's guidelines for free meals and milk and reduced price meals were obtained by multiplying the year 2024 federal income poverty guidelines by 1.30 and 1.85, respectively, and by rounding the result upward to the next whole dollar.

This notice displays only the annual federal poverty guidelines issued by the Department of Health and Human Services because the monthly and weekly federal poverty guidelines are not used to determine the Income Eligibility Guidelines. The chart details the free and reduced price eligibility criteria for monthly income, income received twice monthly (24 payments per year), income received every two weeks (26 payments per year) and weekly income.

Income calculations are made based on the following formulas: monthly income is calculated by dividing the annual income by 12; twice monthly income is computed by dividing annual income by 24; income received every two weeks is calculated by dividing annual income by 26; and weekly income is computed by dividing annual income by 52. All numbers are rounded upward to the next whole dollar. The numbers reflected in this notice for a family of four in the 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia, Guam and the territories represent an increase of 4.0 percent over last year's level for a family of the same size.

Authority: Section 9(b)(1) of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 USC 1758(b)(1)(A)).

Income Eligibility Guidelines

Enable Printing
False
Date
Publication Date
Resource type
Federal Register Documents
Notices
No
Summary

This notice announces the Department's annual adjustments to the Income Eligibility Guidelines to be used in determining eligibility for free and reduced price meals, free milk, and Summer Electronic Benefit Transfer benefits for the period from July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2025. 

Page updated: February 20, 2024

WIC Participant and Program Characteristics 2022

Since 1988, FNS has produced biennial reports on WIC participant and program characteristics (WIC PC) for program monitoring and managing WIC information needs. The 2022 WIC PC report summarizes demographic, income, and health-related characteristics of participants with active certifications in April 2022.

The data for this report are based on WIC administrative records collected from all 89 WIC state agencies (50 states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and 33 tribal organizations). WIC PC 2022 represents information on a census of WIC participants with active certifications in April 2022, including individuals who were not issued food benefits in April. In contrast, for administrative purposes, FNS measures monthly WIC participation based on the number of certified individuals issued food benefits each month. A WIC participant might not be issued food benefits if they fail to pick up their benefits or if they leave WIC before the certification period ends.

Key Findings

  • Nearly 7 million (6.8 million) women, infants, and children were certified to receive WIC benefits as of April 2022, a decline of 3.4 percent from April 2020. Of these, 6.3 million participants were issued food benefits in both April 2020 and 2022, according to administrative data.
  • In 2022, 57.0 percent of WIC participants reported an income below 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, a decline from 64.3 percent in 2020.
  • In 2022, dietary and anthropometric risks were the most common broad categories of nutritional risk assigned at WIC enrollment (62.4 percent and 32.0 percent respectively). Anthropometric and hematological data were missing for most participants, as WIC clinics continued to operate under flexibilities authorized during the COVID-19 public health emergency.
  • In 2022, 70.0 percent of infant WIC participants were breastfed after birth, 32.7 percent at 3 months, 22.5 percent at 6 months, and 15.4 percent at 12 months. Breastfeeding initiation and duration varied by race and ethnicity. This compares similarly to 2020.

Interactive Graphics

  • Combined graphics view
  • Figure 1 - WIC Participation, 1992-2022
  • Figure 2 - Participant Household Income as Percentage of Federal Poverty Guidelines, 2022
  • Figure 3 - Broad Categories of Assigned Nutritional Risks, 2022
  • Figure 4 - Breastfeeding Initiation Rates by State, 2004-2022
  • Figure 5 - Rates of Obesity Among 2- to 4-Year-Old Children by State, 1992-2020
Enable Printing
False
Date
Resource type
Research, Analysis & Background
Research
Research type
Participation Characteristics
Resource materials (Drupal)
Final Report (9.12 MB)
Appendices (11.27 MB)
No
Summary

Since 1988, FNS has produced biennial reports on WIC participant and program characteristics for program monitoring and managing WIC information needs. The 2022 report summarizes demographic, income, and health-related characteristics of participants with active certifications in April 2022.
 

Page updated: February 20, 2024
Page updated: February 09, 2021