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SNAP Community Characteristics - Wyoming

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.05 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 32,606 people in Wyoming. The program served 59 percent of those eligible for benefits in Wyoming in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Wisconsin

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.05 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 805,540 people in Wisconsin. The program served 100 percent of those eligible for benefits in Wisconsin in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - West Virginia

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.5 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 367,908 people in West Virginia. The program served 82.2 percent of those eligible for benefits in West Virginia in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Washington

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.53 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 1,070,933 people in Washington. The program served 100 percent of those eligible for benefits in Washington in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Virginia

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.23 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 860,375 people in Virginia. The program served 83.4 percent of those eligible for benefits in Virginia in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Vermont

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.12 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 84,994 people in Vermont. The program served 100 percent of those eligible for benefits in Vermont in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Utah

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.31 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 225,603 people in Utah. The program served 74.2 percent of those eligible for benefits in Utah in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Texas

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $5.27 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 3,724,688 people in Texas. The program served 72.7 percent of those eligible for benefits in Texas in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - Tennessee

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $1.88 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 1,229,391 people in Tennessee. The program served 99 percent of those eligible for benefits in Tennessee in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.

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SNAP Community Characteristics - South Dakota

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the cornerstone of the Nation’s nutrition assistance safety net. Benefits are available to most people who meet the financial and nonfinancial requirements, and the program serves a broad spectrum of low income people. In Fiscal Year 2015, SNAP provided about $0.15 billion dollars in food benefits to a monthly average of 98,553 people in South Dakota. The program served 94 percent of those eligible for benefits in South Dakota in 2014. SNAP also has an economic multiplier effect; every dollar in new SNAP benefits results in $1.80 in total economic activity.