Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Resource | Fact Sheets

FNS-101: Disaster Assistance

FNS plays a vital role in providing supplemental nutrition assistance when disasters occur by coordinating with state, local, and voluntary organizations to: (1) provide food for shelters and other mass feeding sites, (2) distribute food packages directly to households in specific situations, (3) offer flexibility in nutrition assistance programs’ design and administration to continue providing benefits to participants in need, and (4) approve eligible states’ requests to operate a Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Resource | Fact Sheets

WIC During Disasters Factsheet

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is not designed to be a disaster assistance program, and is, therefore, not considered a first response option for disaster survivors. WIC policies allow state agencies flexibility in program design and administration to support continuation of benefits to participants during times of natural or other disasters. WIC state agencies are encouraged to work with state and local emergency services offices, as well as FEMA, to assist participants during a disaster.

Resource | Fact Sheets

Infant Formula and Food Provided to Disaster Survivors

In the event of a Presidential Disaster Declaration, FNS can procure and provide an emergency supply of infant formula and food to supplement a state’s or FEMA's disaster feeding efforts.

Resource | Fact Sheets

USDA Programs that Assist Individuals and Small Businesses

USDA’s authority to provide emergency assistance for its various disaster relief programs exists under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), Agriculture Secretary disaster designations, Food and Nutrition Act of 2008, as well as other authorizing legislation. These authorities are identified in the various USDA program descriptions.

Resource | Fact Sheets

MyPlate Guide To School Lunch

This factsheet highlights how a variety of healthy foods from each MyPlate food group are included as part of a school lunch. Learn about ways to help children make healthy food and beverage choices at school.

632
Resource | Fact Sheets

Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (D-SNAP)

Through the Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, FNS is able to quickly offer short-term food assistance benefits to families suffering in the wake of a disaster.

Resource | Fact Sheets

USDA Foods During Disaster

USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) supplies USDA Foods to disaster relief organizations such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army for congregate feeding or househole distribution.

Resource | Fact Sheets

Child Nutrition Programs During Disaster

Natural disasters, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, can be devastating to communities and require a quick response. Schools, child care centers, and summer sites that operate the National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs, the Child and Adult Care Food Program, or the Summer Food Service Program can help minimize disruptions to your family.

Resource | Fact Sheets

Office of Emergency Management

Nothing is more important than providing food when people find themselves suddenly, and often critically, in need following a storm, earthquake, flood or other disaster emergency. USDA makes sure that people have enough to eat.

Resource | Info Sheets

Food Prices Database, 2003-04

The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP) Food Prices Database presents the cost of these consumed foods for 2003-04. It shows the actual cost of an apple consumed, the cost of a glass of juice drunk, the cost of lasagna eaten, etc. For example, did you know that when you purchase a whole chicken and only consume the meat, your price per pound eaten is actually twice the price per pound purchased? This is because the weight of the skin and bones is about half of the whole chicken purchased. The information in this database should be of interest to nutrition educators and economists who wish to compare relative prices of different foods as consumed, rather than the purchase price.