Resource | Research | Nutrition Education
WIC Nutrition Education Study: Phase II Final Report

Phase II was a methodological study, conducted in six sites during 2015–2016, to test an approach to determine its feasibility for a national evaluation.

Resource | Research | Impacts/Evaluations
WIC Medicaid II Feasibility Study: Final Report

The USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s (FNS) 1990 WIC Medicaid Study I (WM-I) found that prenatal WIC participation was associated with improved birth outcomes and savings in Medicaid costs. A 2003 study by Buescher, et al., found that WIC participation during childhood was associated with increased health care utilization and Medicaid costs, and concluded that WIC enhanced children’s linkages to the health care system.

Resource | Research | Breastfeeding
WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study 2: Second Year Report

The WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study-2, also known as the “Feeding My Baby” Study, captures data on caregivers and their children over the first 5 years of the child’s life after WIC enrollment to address a series of research questions regarding feeding practices, associations between WIC services and those practices, and the health and nutrition outcomes of children receiving WIC.

Resource | Research | Breastfeeding
WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study 2: Infant Year Report

The WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study–2/“Feeding My Baby” captures data on WIC caregivers and their children over the first 5 years of each child’s life to address a series of research questions regarding feeding practices, the effect of WIC services on those practices, and the health and nutrition outcomes of children on WIC.

Resource | Research | Nutrition Education
WIC Nutrition Education Study: Phase I Report

The WIC Nutrition Education Study (NEST) provides detailed information on WIC nutrition education services and includes the following two phases:
-- Phase I: Comprehensive nationally representative description of WIC nutrition education processes and features.
-- Phase II: Pilot study of the impact of WIC nutrition education on nutrition and other behaviors in six WIC sites.
This report presents the Phase I results of the study.

Resource | Research | Nutrition Education
Nutrition Education Research Review

To assist nutrition educators in their use of relevant research, FNS conducted a review of studies on: Message framing, Use of interactive technology to tailor messages, and Intervention intensity. The review was intended to document how these specific features of nutrition messages and interventions influence the likelihood of promoting more healthful food choices.

Resource | Research | Nutrition Education
Food Stamp Nutrition Education Systems Review

This report presents a comprehensive and systematic national description of food stamp nutrition education operations in FY 2004. It also provides a comparison of those operations to the standards of excellence for nutrition education developed as the Food Stamp Nutrition Education Guiding Principles, released by FNS in September 2005.

Resource | Research | Nutrition Education
Nutrition Education: Principles of Sound Impact Evaluation

The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) is frequently asked, by a variety of nutrition education partners, how it defines a sound impact evaluation. The principles introduced here describe the characteristics of strong impact assessments of nutrition education. They are also consistent with the Government and Performance Results Act and the Office of Management and Budget’s guidance for clear demonstration of program effects.

Resource | Research | Nutrition Education
Fit WIC: Programs to Prevent Childhood Overweight in Your Community

Fit WIC can help the nation’s premier early childhood food and nutrition program work more effectively to reduce and prevent unhealthy weight among our children.

Resource | Research | Food Security
Obesity, Poverty, and Participation in Nutrition Assistance Programs

The national nutrition safety net consists of 15 programs that provide millions of low-income Americans access to a healthy and nutritious diet. It has been observed that many low-income individuals are both overweight and participants in one or more nutrition assistance programs. This has led some to question whether participation in the nutrition assistance programs contributes to the growing problem of overweight and obesity. This report presents the conclusions of an expert panel convened by the Food and Nutrition Service to determine if there is scientific evidence of a relationship between program participation and excess weight.